The 5 Amazing Benefits of Milk Jugs That You May Not Know About Yet

 

My family consumes a ridiculous amount of milk on a weekly basis.

And for you comic aficionados reading this, think Galactus consuming mass amounts of planets.

Yeah, that’s how we consume milk in this family…

Thus I have amassed a ridiculous amount of milk jugs in my possession.

Cues music by Kelise: “My milk jugs brings all the boys to the yard…” 

Have I piqued your interest yet? If not, carry on with your day and let’s pretend you did not just read that out loud.

But if so, great, read on… 😉

And because of this, I have decided to make the best out of this plastic predicament by doing what I do best, by collecting them.

Hey, if you can’t beat them, collect them, right?

  Why would anyone want to collect milk jugs, you might ask?

  Is this woman off her rocker?!

  And to that, I would say,

Why, to hold water, of course!

What on Earth for? Might you ask?

Why to water my flowers and my veggies! (It most definitely IS NOT for bringing any boys to this yard, that’s for sure! 😉 )

 Yep, that’s my answer and I’m sticking to it, for now.

At least until they get busted.

Because after all, they are made out of plastic, and plastic doesn’t last forever, amirite?

In my attempt to live a greener, thriftier, healthier lifestyle, I am all about collecting and holding on to these milk jugs because:

  1. As of writing this post, I am a stay at home mom of 2 kiddos living off of my hubby’s single income.

2.  I want to lead by example and instill in my kids the value of living green and protecting our planet.

3. I am thrifty  (aka cheapskate). Since our water bills are generally more expensive in the summertime due to the hot weather coupled with our desire to maintain a robust growing season. It just made perfect $ense (pun intended) for us to conserve the grey water from our washing machine.

[Note: At the time of living in our previous house, we were lucky enough to have the washing machine dispense water into the laundry basin/utility sink. That made it much easier for me to fill up my milk jugs directly from the hose.]

4. I want to show my kids and lead by example that it is possible to live well and do so within our means by not spending money on unnecessary things. Find ways to stretch out your usage and reuse and recycle items for other purposes other than what they were originally intended.

5. I get a great work out from going back and forth to collect the water and hand watering the garden myself rather than relying on a garden hose. I get to kill 2 birds with 1 stone, or rather “fill two needs with one deed,” (is what my husband likes to say). I get to work out while my flowers and produce gets to reuse water that would otherwise be thrown down the drain anyhow. I think of it this way, if it’s all going down the drain anyway, then why not recycle it in your plants. The folks in California would gladly nod their heads to this in unison.

Here is how I use the milk jugs:

If you feel inclined to do so, take the caps off and drill a few holes in them. And there you have it, your very own version of a DIY watering can.

But- if you don’t care about whipping out a tool, then don’t worry about the drill. The purpose of drilling the holes in the caps is to control the water flow in your milk jug.

I’ve done it both ways: drilling the holes in the caps, and just leaving it as is. And what I’ve found is that it really doesn’t matter.

Your plants will love you for it despite the little holes and they will return the love with beautiful blooms and gorgeous fruit.

 

Label 1 jug for my Produce (fruits and veggies):

  • Whenever I wash my produce, (usually on the same day that I go grocery shopping) I would wash and cut up my fruit and veggies and put in baggies or plastic containers and plan out our meals for the week.

 

  • I only save the rinse water that I have just washed my produce with inside the milk jugs labeled:                                                                                                          For Fruits & Veggies ONLY.

 

  • I only use those particular jugs that are labeled: For Fruits & Veggies ONLY, to water the fruits and veggies that I grow in my organic garden. (This is my preference but you can use whatever you would like to use that is safe for yourself and your family, to each their own.)

 

  • Quick Tip: If your kids are helping you water your garden, draw a picture of some fruit on the label: For Fruits & Veggies ONLY, so that they can quickly identify which is which. This was especially important when my kids were toddlers and did not know how to read yet. Even still, they were eager to help in any way they could and they were proud to be able to do some small task on their own! 😉

 

Label another jug for my flowers:

  • Now, whenever I do my laundry, I save the rinse cycle water or grey water and collect it in my milk jugs.

 

  • This grey water is only to be used solely for the purpose of watering flowers. (Not to be confused for the other jug, again, this is my preference only here as well. But you can do whatever suits you and your family.)

 

  • These jugs are labeled: For Flowers ONLY, I would also draw a picture of a flower on these jugs with a sharpie, so my kids can quickly tell the difference.

 

  • The reason why I separate them by label and by cap color is so we do not use the wrong jug to water the wrong things.

 

 

  • I use a capful per gallon of water of liquid feed fertilizer every two weeks to treat my flowers and it helps them maintain their blooms even longer throughout the spring, summer, and even well into the fall. (I try to keep them alive through Thanksgiving, weather permitting some years.)

 

It’s a very cheap and effective DIY project that cost you nothing more than the cost of the milk that your family would otherwise consume anyway. 

What otherwise would have ended up in the dumpster, now has yet another purpose. 

Yay you, kudos! ☺

You’ve just done your part in helping to save our planet, thank you! 😉 

I am curious about how the rest of the world recycle, reduce, and reuse. Here are some more ideas around the web to help you figure out what to do with all those milk jugs:

http://cooldiyideas.com/16-creative-ways-to-reuse-and-upcycle-milk-jugs/

http://www.wrappedinrust.com/18-ways-to-reuse-your-plastic-milk-jugs/

What are some of the ways that you and your family have started to implement in your own homes?

 

 

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